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The Lord’s Prayer

Tertullian once said: “Our Father is the “summary of the whole Gospel”. “Since the Lord, after handing over the practice of prayer, said elsewhere, ‘Ask and you will receive,’ and since everyone has petitions which are peculiar to his circumstances, the regular and appropriate prayer (the Lord’s Prayer) is said first, as the foundation of further desires.” In it we ask, not only for all the things we can rightly desire, but also in the sequence that they should be desired. This prayer not only teaches us to ask for things, but also in what order we should desire them (St Thomas Aquinas, STh II-II. 83, 9).

The traditional expression “the Lord’s Prayer” – oratio Dominica – means that the prayer to our Father is taught and given to us by the Lord Jesus. The prayer that comes to us from Jesus is truly unique: it is “of the Lord.” On the one hand, in the words of this prayer the only Son gives us the words the Father gave him (John 17:7): he is the master of our prayer. On the other, as Word incarnate, he knows in his human heart the needs of his human brothers and sisters and reveals them to us: he is the model of our prayer.

But Jesus does not give us a formula to repeat mechanically (Matt 6:7; 1 Kings 18:26-29). As in every vocal prayer, it is through the Word of God that the Holy Spirit teaches the children of God to pray to their Father. Jesus not only gives us the words of our filial prayer; at the same time he gives us the Spirit by whom these words become in us “spirit and life”(John 6:63). Even more, the proof and possibility of our filial prayer is that the Father “sent the Spirit of his Son into our hearts, crying, ‘Abba! Father!'” (Gal 4:6) Since our prayer sets forth our desires before God, it is again the Father, “he who searches the hearts of men,” who “knows what is the mind of the Spirit, because the Spirit intercedes for the saints according to the will of God.”(Romans 8:27) The prayer to Our Father is inserted into the mysterious mission of the Son and of the Spirit (CCC 2765-2766).

Our Father

who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name.

Thy kingdom come.

Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread,

and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Amen.

The first series of petitions carries us toward him, for his own sake: thy name… thy kingdom… thy will…! It is characteristic of love to think first of the one whom we love. These three supplications were already answered in the saving sacrifice of Christ, but they are henceforth directed in hope toward their final fulfillment, for God is not yet all in all.

The second series of petitions unfolds as an offering up of our expectations that draws down upon itself the eyes of the Father of mercies. They go up from us and concern us from this very moment in our present world: “give us… forgive us… lead us not… deliver us…” The fourth and fifth petitions concern our life as such – to be fed and to be healed of sin; the last two concern our battle for the victory of life – that battle of prayer.

The Lord’s Prayer is the quintessential prayer of the Church. It is an integral part of the major hours of the Divine Office and of the sacraments of Christian initiation: Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist. Integrated into the Eucharist it reveals the eschatological character of its petitions, hoping for the Lord, “until he comes” (1 Cor 11:26). In response to his disciples’ request “Lord, teach us to pray” (Lk 11:1), Jesus entrusts them with the fundamental Christian prayer, the Our Father.